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Posts for: December, 2015

By Family Foot and Ankle Center
December 30, 2015
Category: Foot Care

Fashion-Forward ShoesSome people are unfortunately more concerned with the way that their shoes look than what’s happening to their feet due to wearing those shoes on a daily basis. Some “fashion­forward” shoes, as nice as they may look on the outside, can actually be fungus traps, leaving the feet susceptible to the effects of foot and toenail funguses. Talk to a podiatrist about foot fungus and how your shoes can be creating the ideal environment for fungi to live on your feet.

What Is Foot Fungus?

A fungus is an organism that feeds and thrives on other organic matter. When it’s not controlled, it can lead to infections in parts of the body, like the feet. There are two types of fungal infections that commonly attack the feet:

  • Athlete’s Foot
  • Toenail Fungus

In both cases, overgrowth of fungus causes redness, itching, burning sensation and peeling of the skin. Toenail fungus also causes the nail to thicken, become yellow and flake. A strong, unattractive odor is also commonly associated with foot fungus infections.

Those Fashion­Forward Shoes...

The problem with many fashion­forward shoes is that they’re not designed to help your feet—they’re designed only to look a certain way for style. Some shoes don’t allow any room for your feet to breathe. Foot fungus thrives in warm, moist environments, so shoes that are enclosed or made of very restrictive materials (like plastic or pleather) often foster fungal infections. Fashionable women’s shoes often have pointy toes and very high heels (as high as six inches), causing the toes to push up against the front unnaturally. That pressure, combined with sweat, can also cause toenail fungus to develop.

Making Better Shoe Choices

If you are concerned about or have had past problems with foot fungus, it could be due to the choices you’re making in shoes. Here are a few tips for buying better shoes:

  • Whenever possible, wear shoes that have an open toe to allow the toenails to remain dry and cool
  • Pick shoes made of breathable fabric (like leather) and soles (ask your doctor about orthotic inserts that best manage moisture)
  • Do not share your shoes with other people who may have fungus problems
  • Ask your podiatrist about SteriShoe, an ultraviolet light that can kill fungus and bacteria that can form inside of your shoes

Your foot health should always trump your desire to wear fashionable shoes. Consult your podiatrist about better footwear choices that will both look good on your feet and prevent problems with fungal infections.


By Family Foot and Ankle Center
December 15, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Claw Toes  

Claw ToesClaw toes are can cause discomfort and embarrassment. Here you will learn how to recognize their characteristics and what can be done to correct them.

Claw toes, sometimes referred to as claw foot, live up to their name. The condition causes the toes to curl into an unnatural, claw­like position. They can be uncomfortable, particularly while wearing shoes, and can be embarrassing when it comes time to wear open­toed footwear in warmer months. Fortunately, they are treatable, sometimes just with simple home care.

Claw toes overview

Claw toes can develop from nerve damage, muscle weakness or inflammation. Sometimes they are a congenital deformity, meaning that they are part of a person's makeup from birth. They seem to be fairly common in people with high arches. Claw toes cause the first joint of your toes to flex upwards and the second and sometimes third joint to point downwards, resulting in the appearance of a talon, or claw. Calluses can form from the joints pressing against the inside of your shoes. It is a progressive condition; without treatment, claw toes will become more pronounced and uncomfortable.

Home treatment

If rigidity has not set in the joints, you can try simple exercises, such as using your toes to pick up objects from the floor, to straighten them out. Massaging them into a normal position is also useful. You should always wear comfortable shoes with a proper fit and plenty of room in the toes. A shoe repair shop can stretch the toe area to make more space. Pads worn inside the shoes can help to shift your weight and relieve pressure.

Medical intervention

Your doctor may order physical therapy sessions for stretching and strengthening your toe joints. Physical therapists can also design shoe inserts to correct the problem. If your condition has progressed to the point that you cannot manually straighten your toes, surgery can be performed to reposition the joints.

Podiatrists are trained to recognize and diagnose claw toes and many other foot problems. Call for an appointment today to discuss any concerns you may have.


By Family Foot and Ankle Center
December 03, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Calcaneal Wounds  

Calcaneal WoundPatients often come to foot doctors with concerns about sores, wounds and lesions on the feet. One type of foot problem that is very urgent for podiatrists and their patients alike is a calcaneal wound. Without critical and proper treatment, these types of lesions could become very serious and even lead to the amputation of foot tissue. Learn more about calcaneal wounds, what causes them and how they can be treated successfully by your podiatrist.

What Is a Calcaneal Wound?

A calcaneal wound is a problem that occurs around the heel. The word “calcaneus” is a more formal word for the heel bone. The wound progressively gets worse, starting as a small sore, progressing to an ulcer and then (if not properly treated in early stages) it can become an infected series of lesions and ulcers that requires tissue to be removed. In extreme cases, amputation may be necessary.

How Does this Type of Wound Develop?

Calcaneal wounds usually develop as a result of direct injury to the heel of the foot, obesity (continual pressure on the same area of the foot causes the ulcer to form) or diabetic complications. If a patient experiences a severe trauma to the heel of the foot that causes a wound, but doesn’t get it treated it can progress to an infection. Patients who are overweight often develop pressure ulcer on their heels. And diabetic patients who experience neuropathy (nerve damage) due to out­of­control blood glucose levels are also susceptible to calcaneal wounds.

Calcaneal Wound Treatments

It’s important to see a podiatrist at the first signs of a calcaneal wound. The usual treatment plan includes cleaning the wound thoroughly, removing bad tissue, applying wound care medication, bandaging the area and prescribing antibiotics to fight infection. In serious cases surgical treatment may be necessary correct the problem.

If you are at risk of developing calcaneal wounds, sores or ulcers in any part of your foot, keep a direct line open with your podiatrist. Schedule regular checkups with your foot doctor to continually monitor the condition of your feet. It’s also important that you follow doctor’s orders from your primary care provider.




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