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Posts for tag: Ankle Pain

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
May 02, 2016
Category: Foot Care

For some women, there’s nothing quite as exciting as getting a brand new pair of elegant high heels. High heels come in a number of attractive high heels injurystyles, including pumps, stilettos, wedges, Mary Janes, platforms and sling backs. But those pretty heels can hide some pretty ugly truths. Take a moment to learn more about the hidden dangers of high heels and how they can cause serious problems for your feet.

Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are bumps that form on the heel bone over time due to continuous friction or pressure. The design of many high heeled shoes puts a strain on the back of the foot, leading to complications with heel spurs and irritation of the skin.

Ankle Injury

Women who wear very high heels also put their ankles at risk of injury. If the wearer falls or has a sudden movement in the wrong direction, it could cause a sprained ankle. The higher the heel, the worse the potential effects of a fall.

Hammertoes

One of the most commonly reported problems that podiatrists receive from women who wear high heels is the appearance of hammertoes. A hammertoe develops as the toes are pinched and squeezed forward in the front of the heel—the toes begin to bend at the joints into an unnatural shape. In some cases, the joints are aggravated to the point where the wearer can no longer bend the toes back up.

Corns and Calluses

Hammertoes are often seen in combination with unsightly corns that develop on the tops of the toes due to friction with the shoe. Calluses also often develop on the sides of the feet and on the bottom, where the ball of the feet meets the ground each time you take a step.

As gorgeous as those high heels on the rack may look, it’s also important to think about how your feet could look after a while if you wear them often. If you enjoy wearing high heels, protect your feet by maintaining regular appointments with your podiatrist. A number of modern solutions and foot therapies are available, so if you have any of the symptoms mentioned above, call your podiatrist today to schedule an urgent consultation.

By Family Foot and Ankle Center
August 03, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ankle Pain   Foot Pain   Heel Pain   Yoga   Stretching  

Yoga and Foot PainFoot pain can range from your toes to your heel. When it comes to heel pain, also known as Plantar Fasciitis, affects 60% of individuals in their lifetime. When the thick tissue on the bottom of your foot called the Plantar Fascia becomes inflamed, it can become a daily annoyance. But you still need to stay fit. So what's the solution?

Yoga is a low-intensity, simple, and impactful workout. Not only does it help you stay fit when your heel pain prevents you from following your regular execrise regimen, but stretching and low-impact exercise, both of which yoga covers, can help ease your pain. Tight calf muscles often make Plantar Fasciitis worse, and yoga can help stretch and loosen them.

Remember, any pose in yoga should only be performed to the extent that you feel comfortable - pain is not gain! Go at your own pace and react to your own flexibility, making adjustments as you go.

Mountain Pose:  This is a great pose to start with, especially if you aren't very familiar with yoga, as it forms the basis for many other poses and helps get you acclimated.

  1. Stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Try to distribute your weight as evenly as possible across all parts of the foot, from the toes to the heel to the arch.
  2. Straighten your legs without locking your knees. Lift your arches.
  3. Engage the muscles in your thighs, turning them inward slightly. Try to lengthen through the base of your spine and tailbone without curving your back.
  4. Press your shoulder blades back and down to open the chest. Allow your arms to hang loose. 
  5. Try to balance as evenly in the pose as possible, breathing deeply. Feeling the distribution of weight in your feet, do your best to keep your weight even at all four corners of the foot, to keep your head lifted with your chin parallel to the floor, and remain as even and symmetrical in weight and posture as possible.

Downward Dog Pose: The pose many people think of when they think of yoga. While this pose doesn't require a yoga mat, performing it on a non-slippery surface is helpful, because you will need to put weight into the feet, and they may slide back if you try it on a hard floor.

  1. While sitting on the floor, move onto all fours, placing your hands down firmly on the floor slightly ahead of your shoulders, palm and fingers spread. Keep your knees directly in line with your pelvis.
  2. Breathe out and lift your knees from the floor, tucking your toes under and standing on the balls of your feet falling back almost as if you will sit on your heels. Keep your hands firmly on the floor.
  3. Then push up with your legs, allowing your heels to fall back toward the floor, pushing your pelvis into the air, hands still on the ground, forming an inverted v-shape with your body.
  4. Keep your head between your arms rather than letting it hang loose toward the floor. Try to distribute your weight between feet and hands, to avoid putting too much weight on either the ankles or the wrists. Drop your shoulder blades 
  5. Try to press your chest toward your legs as much as is comfortable. You can also try to press your heels into the floor, again, only as much as is comfortable. Try to rotate your arms so your elbows face toward your thumbs, and rotate your thighs inward, as in mountain pose, to engage the quads.
  6. Your hands should be shoulder-width apart, your feet hip-width apart, and hands and feet should be parallel to each other. Your toes should point straight ahead. Take deep, long breaths, and stretch into the pose as much as you feel comfortable doing. 
  7. Breathe into the pose. When you want to release the pose, perform a reverse of how you pressed yourself up - bend your knees in, then move back to hands and knees.

Chair Pose:  Chair pose offers a great stretch. As a pose that involved standing on both feet, one of the great things about it is that you can do it anywhere - even at the office!

  1. Start in Mountain Pose.
  2. Raise your arms over your head. Do not bend your elbows.
  3. Bend your knees and gently push your pelvis down as if you are sitting into an invisible chair behind you. Try to make your thighs as parallel as possible to the floor without losing your balance.
  4. Keep your lower back lengthened, not allowing it to curve into the pose, maintaining a straight back. Try to also shift as much weight as possible into your heels. Look straight ahead.
  5. Sink as deep into the pose as you feel comfortable, then try to hold it, again breathing deeply through the nose.
  6. To release, exhale and straighten the knees, coming back to Mountain.

Yoga offers a heel-pain friendly way to get in a workout, and may even help ease your pain. For other foot and ankle pain remedies and treatments, contact your podiatrist today!

By Family Foot and Ankle Center
December 01, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ankle Pain   Foot Pain  

Any time a person engages in sports, they are running the risk of suffering an injury to the foot and ankle. Many of the injuries that cause foot ailments and pain are caused by high impact sports, such as

running. Other times foot problems can arise from wearing improper footwear or from inadequate training. 


 
There are a number of foot conditions that an athlete can suffer from, including ingrown toenails, athlete’s foot and blisters. Let’s take a brief look at two of the more serious and most common conditions: plantar fasciitis and ankle sprains. When these conditions occur, your podiatrist in Fairfax is available to provide you with the best treatment available.
 

Heel Pain caused by Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot ailments experienced by runners and the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a thick, dense tissue that runs from the ball of the foot along the arch, connecting to the heel. People with flat feet or individuals who overpronate are more susceptible to heel pain because of the increased stress that occurs at the heel. 
 
Many times the pain is worse in the morning when you first get up, but subsides as you move around throughout the day. Treatment will vary depending on each case, but generally rest, ice and stretching can help ease the pain. When conservative treatments aren’t effective and the pain persists, see your Fairfax podiatrist at [Name of Practice] for recommended treatment, such as orthotics. 
 

Ankle Sprains

Caused by an unnatural twisting or force on the anklebones of the foot, an ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries experienced by athletes. The severity of a sprain will depend on the extent of stretching and tearing of ligaments. And how severe the tear is will determine how long it takes for your ankle to heal- sometimes up to several months.   When a sprain first occurs there will likely be chronic ankle pain. The ankle will swell and possible discoloration may occur. 
 
The RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) procedure should be administered right away for an ankle sprain. Serious ankle sprains, particularly among competitive athletes, may require surgery to repair and tighten the damaged ligaments.  If you’re prone to ankle sprains, avoid running on uneven terrain and wear firm, supportive footwear for improved stability. Unfortunately ankle sprains are often recurring. Your podiatrist in Fairfax can help determine the severity of your sprain and the necessary course of treatment, including exercises to strengthen the weak ankle. 
 
Heel pain and ankle sprains can be easily treated, yet many athletes delay proper treatment for fear of discontinuing their favorite sport.  Delaying treatment will only make the injury worse, often times leading to a far more serious injury that requires extensive care and treatment.  If you frequently participate in sports and other physical activities, it’s important to pay close attention to your feet and ankles as they are placed under tremendous pressure and are at high risk for injury. 
 
Remember to train properly for your specific activity and wear supportive shoes that offer stability for your specific sport.  If you are experiencing pain for extended periods of time, take time to rest. Chronic pain likely indicates a serious foot problem and continuing to play your sport will only make matters worse. Talk to your podiatrist in Fairfax at [Name of Practice] about the best ways to prevent and treat common sports-related foot injuries. 
By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
December 17, 2013
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ankle Pain   Joint Pain   Foot Pain  

Joint Pain In FeetThe foot contains 26 bones and more than 30 joints, which can create multiple areas for pain to originate.  Swelling, tenderness, stiffness, redness, bruising, and/or increased warmth may accompany the pain in the affected joints. Your podiatrist in Fairfax describes joint pain as being caused by trauma, infection, arthritis, bursitis, gout, or structural foot problems.

When you first notice any joint pain in your foot and ankle, your Fairfax podiatrist may initially treat your pain with the conservative treatment, RICE, which stands for:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevation

Your podiatrist in Fairfax will also recommend a limitation of walking and weight bearing on the painful foot to ensure further damage does not develop.  Use of steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, and ice can also help to reduce local inflammation and pain.  Custom orthotics may also be prescribed to support the foot and reduce the pain. 

Family Foot and Ankle Centers can best determine the cause of joint pain and recommend the appropriate treatment.  If you are experiencing joint pain in your foot or ankle, schedule an appointment today to ensure a speedy recovery. 

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
December 02, 2013
Category: Foot Care

Sprained AnkleHave you ever twisted your ankle while participating in a sport?  Or maybe you simply slipped while walking?  Either way, ankle sprains and fractures should not be ignored.  Ankle sprains are common injuries that occur when ligaments are stretched or torn, with nearly 85% occurring laterally, or on the outside of the ankle joints. By visiting your podiatrist in Fairfax, you can receive the care you need to get back on your feet.

Symptoms of a Sprained or Fractured Ankle

Your symptoms upon spraining your ankle may vary depending on the severity of your pain and how it occurred. The symptoms of an ankle sprain may include:

  • Pain or soreness
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Difficulty walking
  • Stiffness in the joint

All ankle sprains will produce some level of pain at the time of your injury and the joint will also feel tender, beginning to swell.  If your sprain is mild, you may experience a slight loss in the function of your joint.

With a more serious sprain, you will most likely fall during the initial impact of the injury.  It will often be difficult to move or put weight on your injured ankle, producing bruising and swelling from the ankle to the foot.  Once you have had ankle sprains or other ankle injuries before, you may have a weakened joint that creates more of a chance for future injuries to take place.

Common symptoms of an ankle fracture are similar to ankle sprains, and include:

  • Pain to touch
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Inability to walk on the leg
  • Deformity around the ankle

Treatment and Prevention

Treatment for your ankle sprain begins with self-care.  The RICE evaluation is highly recommended upon the initial onset of your injury:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevation

When your podiatrist feels you are ready to begin participating in sports and exercising, you can help prevent further sprains and fractures by wearing an ankle brace during the first initial months of being back on your ankle.  Special wraps are also available to protect your ankle. 

If your symptoms still persist after taking the initial step of at-home-care, or if you suspect you might have a fracture, a visit to your Fairfax podiatrist may be in order.  With a consultation with Family Foot and Ankle Centers, your ankle sprain or fracture can be treated and further prevented.  There is no need to put an end to your athletic lifestyle with recurring ankle injuries.



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