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Posts for tag: Running

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
August 02, 2016
Category: Foot Care

Find out how to prevent and treat running injuries.

If athletes could have it their way, they would enjoy every mile of their run without experiencing any pain, discomfort or soreness. While this running injuriessounds ideal, it’s sadly not the reality we live in. With uneven and sometimes rough and rocky terrain, runners face a variety of conditions that are tough on their feet and ankles and can cause serious issues. Here are some of the most common running injuries we see and what you can do about them.

Achilles Tendinitis

This condition often occurs because of repeated stress or overuse and affects the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the back of the heel. When a runner develops Achilles tendinitis, this means the tendon is irritated and often stiff.

  • Risk Factors: This condition is usually the result of a sudden increase in training, which can put unnecessary pressure on your calves. While it’s great to push yourself during your workout, you must create realistic goals to prevent injuries.
  • Care: You will want to rest whenever you can and elevate your foot. Apply ice for 10 to 20 minutes a day, several times a day. Also, perform strengthening and stretching exercises like heel drops, and opt for low-­impact cardio instead.
  • Workout Impact: If you notice pain during or after your run you need to halt all activities until your injury is better. This is certainly not a condition that you want to continue to work out with. If you stop your workouts while the condition is still minor, you will have a faster healing time than someone who continues to work out through the pain.

Stress Fractures

Repeated stress and overtraining are the two main causes of these fractures, which can be caused by increasing your workout intensity or duration too fast. They are one of the most serious conditions that runners face.

  • Risk Factors: However, those who’ve been running longer are less at risk for stress fractures than those who just started. Women are also more prone to stress fractures than men, often due to a lack of sufficient calorie intake or other nutritional deficits.
  • Care: Stay off your foot until you can walk without pain. Once this happens, you can slowly incorporate jogging into your routine. You can use OTC pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain and swelling. Talk to your podiatrist about whether you may need crutches.
  • Workout Impact: Do not workout while you have a stress fracture. You should take anywhere from eight to 16 weeks away from your workouts. This, of course, will depend on the severity of your fracture. Again, opt for swimming or other low-­impact sports in the meantime.

If you ever experience severe or chronic pain in your feet or ankles it’s important to contact your podiatrist right away. While at-­home care can certainly alleviate your symptoms, if your symptoms affect your day­to­day activities, then it’s time to seek medical attention.

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
May 16, 2016
Category: Foot Care

Consider the health of your feet the next time you purchase your running shoes.

If you are an avid runner, nothing sounds better than lacing up your shoes and spending the day outdoors. However, do you think about the proper running shoeshealth of your feet while you are running your favorite trails? Are you considering how much protection your feet are getting or the stability they need while you pound the pavement? Our feet and ankles play a major role in our ability to enjoy active endeavors like running. Therefore, when it’s time to pick out a new pair of running shoes, here are some tips you should follow.

Figure out your foot type

Do you have flat feet or high arches? When you go in to try on running shoes, go to an athletic store where specialists and experts can help you choose the proper running shoes to fit your foot shape. By choosing shoes based on the arch of your foot, you can easily prevent certain injuries.

Do you pronate?

How your foot hits the ground while you move will also affect the type of shoes you purchase. Those with flat feet often overpronate, which means that the foot rolls severely inward every time your foot hits the ground. Whenever the foot rolls inward it causes pain and strain to the foot. By going to a specialty running store you can talk to someone who will be able to determine whether you pronate so you get the best running shoes for your feet.

By a half size up

This might sound a bit odd, but did you know that your feet actually swell while you run? Therefore, if your shoes just fit or even fit a little snug, this can cause blisters and other foot problems due to overcrowded toes. In order to combat swollen feet, it’s not a bad idea to go up a half size in your shoes than you normally would.

Know when to replace your old shoes

No one likes to say goodbye to their old running shoes, especially if a lot of great memories were formed and races were won while wearing them; however, shoes don’t last forever and the longer you wear worn­out shoes the more damaging it could be for your feet. A good rule of thumb is to replace your shoes every 300 to 500 miles.

If you have any questions about what running shoe is best for you, call your podiatrist today!

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
August 09, 2011
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Running  

Foot Care for RunnersIf you're a runner, it goes without saying that your feet take the brunt of the punishment. In fact, for runners the feet are more vulnerable to injury than any other part of the body. Luckily, both long-distance runners and casual joggers can improve their performance by paying extra attention to their feet and taking steps to prevent common foot problems. Poor fitting footwear is often the source of many foot problems caused by running. A visit to Family Foot and Ankle Center can help you determine the best shoes for your foot structure.

A Runner's Road Block

While many running-related foot injures can result from a fall or twisted ankle, most running injuries are caused by overuse, meaning the majority of runners experience foot and ankle pain because they do too much for too long. Runners should be aware of the signs of foot problems that can slow them down if not treated promptly. Common foot and ankle injuries experienced by runners include:

Achilles Tendonitis: Achilles tendonitis and other calf-related injuries are prevalent in runners. Poor training, overuse and improper footwear are the three most common reasons for this condition. A sudden increase in distance or pace can strain the muscles and tendons in the foot and ankle, causing small tears within these structures that result in pain and inflammation. Appropriate shoes and training are the most important steps to preventing Achilles tendonitis. Conservative treatment includes, rest, ice, stretching, and sometimes orthotics or physical therapy.

Heel Pain: Runners develop heel pain more than any other foot-related injury. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, which is the result of excess stress placed on a ligament in the bottom of the foot. Rest, stretching and support are the best ways to ease the pain and inflammation. Reduce your mileage and avoid hill and speed workouts. Stretch before and after you run, and ice your heel after each workout. Special splints and shoe inserts from Family Foot and Ankle Center may also provide support and relief for your heel pain.

Stress Fractures: Stress fractures are small cracks in the surface of a bone. Runners generally notice gradual muscle soreness, stiffness, and pain on the affected bone, most often in the lower leg or the foot. Early diagnosis is critical as the small fracture can spread and eventually become a complete fracture of the bone. Stress fractures are typically caused by an increase in training that occurs more quickly than the body's ability to build up and strengthen the bone. If you have symptoms of a stress fracture, you should stop running immediately and see a podiatrist at Family Foot and Ankle Center. This injury can keep a runner off the roads for several weeks and is not an injury that you can run through. Depending on the severity of the stress fracture, a cast may be necessary.

If you experience chronic foot pain from running, make an appointment with a podiatrist at our Fairfax office. Leaving foot injuries untreated could result in more serious conditions, ultimately keeping you from your best performance. Keep in mind that these are not the only foot ailments caused by running, and when at-home foot care isn't effective, you'll need to be evaluated by a podiatrist. As in most cases, prevention is your best treatment. Good footwear, proper training and recognizing a problem before it becomes serious are your keys to staying on the road and avoiding foot injuries.



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