Serving Ashburn/Leesburg, Fairfax/Burke, Reston/Herndon and McLean /Great Falls VA.

Posts for tag: Sprained Ankle

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
December 17, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Sprained Ankle  

An ankle sprain occurs when the foot rolls or twists to the point where a ligament inside stretches beyond its normal capacity. Ankle sprains are extremely common, with an estimated 25,000 sprains happening in the United States every day. Athletes and people who work outdoors or on uneven surfaces are at a higher risk for spraining their ankle. Regular wear of high-heeled shoes is also a risk factor.

Sprained ankles are diagnosed by degree; that is, the severity of the sprain and the symptoms it produces. Grade 1 sprains are the mildest, with minimal swelling and tenderness due to a slight ligament tear. Usually, Grade 1 sprains still allow for weight to be put on the ankle. Grade 2 sprains have a more significant injury to the ligament and, while walking may still be possible, it is painful. Grade 3 sprains are diagnosed when the affected ligament has sustained a complete tear and the ankle cannot bear weight. Grade 3 sprains typically display obvious bruising and swelling around the ankle.

The grade of an ankle sprain will determine the treatment. The tried-and-true RICE method - rest, ice, compression, and elevation - is usually sufficient for Grade 1 sprains. Refraining from walking, keeping the ankle elevated for the first two days, stabilizing the ankle with a compression dressing, and applying ice to reduce swelling helps the sprain resolve within 2 to 4 weeks. Grade 2 sprains also respond well to RICE treatment, although healing typically takes longer and a firmer immobilization device, like a splint, is typically recommended. Grade 3 sprains often require similar treatment used for ankle fractures; a cast or brace may be needed and surgery may be considered for some patients.

To ensure proper healing, it is important to follow the recommendations of your podiatrist. Attempting to return to normal activity too soon could result in a repeat injury or permanent ankle instability.

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
May 02, 2016
Category: Foot Care

For some women, there’s nothing quite as exciting as getting a brand new pair of elegant high heels. High heels come in a number of attractive high heels injurystyles, including pumps, stilettos, wedges, Mary Janes, platforms and sling backs. But those pretty heels can hide some pretty ugly truths. Take a moment to learn more about the hidden dangers of high heels and how they can cause serious problems for your feet.

Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are bumps that form on the heel bone over time due to continuous friction or pressure. The design of many high heeled shoes puts a strain on the back of the foot, leading to complications with heel spurs and irritation of the skin.

Ankle Injury

Women who wear very high heels also put their ankles at risk of injury. If the wearer falls or has a sudden movement in the wrong direction, it could cause a sprained ankle. The higher the heel, the worse the potential effects of a fall.

Hammertoes

One of the most commonly reported problems that podiatrists receive from women who wear high heels is the appearance of hammertoes. A hammertoe develops as the toes are pinched and squeezed forward in the front of the heel—the toes begin to bend at the joints into an unnatural shape. In some cases, the joints are aggravated to the point where the wearer can no longer bend the toes back up.

Corns and Calluses

Hammertoes are often seen in combination with unsightly corns that develop on the tops of the toes due to friction with the shoe. Calluses also often develop on the sides of the feet and on the bottom, where the ball of the feet meets the ground each time you take a step.

As gorgeous as those high heels on the rack may look, it’s also important to think about how your feet could look after a while if you wear them often. If you enjoy wearing high heels, protect your feet by maintaining regular appointments with your podiatrist. A number of modern solutions and foot therapies are available, so if you have any of the symptoms mentioned above, call your podiatrist today to schedule an urgent consultation.

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
June 18, 2014
Category: Foot Care

What’s Causing my Leg Pain?

Leg pain and discomfort can knock you off your feet for a variety of reasons, but it should never be ignored. Aching calves, burning legs, numbness in your feet—pain in the lower extremities is a common complaint that might send you to your podiatrist in Fairfax at Family Foot and Ankle Centers.  If you are experiencing leg pain, it can be due to an array of reasons including:

Shin Splints. This type of lower leg pain occurs when connective tissues and muscles along the edge of the shin bone become inflamed.  You may experience this after running or jumping, especially on hard surfaces due to the repetitive force that overloads muscles and tendons.

Flat Feet. If you suffer from flat feet, and do not have proper orthotics or shoes you can experience leg pain.  Due to the outward rotation of the foot and leg, you may begin to feel pain.  To treat flat feet, it is important to visit Family Foot and Ankle Centers, Fairfax podiatrist, for proper diagnosis and orthotics.

Sprained Ankle.  A fracture or sprain can also cause leg pain.  For mild sprains, your Fairfax podiatrist recommends RICE: rest, ice, compression and elevation.  For a more severe sprain or fracture, apply ice and visit Family Foot and Ankle Centers immediately.  

Diabetic Neuropathy. With diabetes, nerves can be damaged from high blood sugar levels.  Diabetes can cause pain in both legs along with numbness and less sensation in lower legs.  By visiting your podiatrist in Fairfax you can take charge of your diabetes and protect your feet and legs.

By visiting Family Foot and Ankle Centers, you can prevent leg pain and foot pain.  Visit your Fairfax podiatrist today for further diagnosis and treatment options so you can live pain free.

By Family Foot and Ankle Centers
December 02, 2013
Category: Foot Care

Sprained AnkleHave you ever twisted your ankle while participating in a sport?  Or maybe you simply slipped while walking?  Either way, ankle sprains and fractures should not be ignored.  Ankle sprains are common injuries that occur when ligaments are stretched or torn, with nearly 85% occurring laterally, or on the outside of the ankle joints. By visiting your podiatrist in Fairfax, you can receive the care you need to get back on your feet.

Symptoms of a Sprained or Fractured Ankle

Your symptoms upon spraining your ankle may vary depending on the severity of your pain and how it occurred. The symptoms of an ankle sprain may include:

  • Pain or soreness
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Difficulty walking
  • Stiffness in the joint

All ankle sprains will produce some level of pain at the time of your injury and the joint will also feel tender, beginning to swell.  If your sprain is mild, you may experience a slight loss in the function of your joint.

With a more serious sprain, you will most likely fall during the initial impact of the injury.  It will often be difficult to move or put weight on your injured ankle, producing bruising and swelling from the ankle to the foot.  Once you have had ankle sprains or other ankle injuries before, you may have a weakened joint that creates more of a chance for future injuries to take place.

Common symptoms of an ankle fracture are similar to ankle sprains, and include:

  • Pain to touch
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Inability to walk on the leg
  • Deformity around the ankle

Treatment and Prevention

Treatment for your ankle sprain begins with self-care.  The RICE evaluation is highly recommended upon the initial onset of your injury:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevation

When your podiatrist feels you are ready to begin participating in sports and exercising, you can help prevent further sprains and fractures by wearing an ankle brace during the first initial months of being back on your ankle.  Special wraps are also available to protect your ankle. 

If your symptoms still persist after taking the initial step of at-home-care, or if you suspect you might have a fracture, a visit to your Fairfax podiatrist may be in order.  With a consultation with Family Foot and Ankle Centers, your ankle sprain or fracture can be treated and further prevented.  There is no need to put an end to your athletic lifestyle with recurring ankle injuries.



Contact Us